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Archive for April, 2015

Mother’s Day provides us with a great reason to get outside and enjoy the last days of autumn here at Taylors – that magical time when the leaves on the trees are turning those beautiful hues of yellow, red and orange. There is nothing that beats catching the sun lighting up a brightly-coloured tree in full autumn display!

We love to celebrate our mums with a picnic at the vineyard, and a bottle or three of beautiful wine. Of course, you could also crank up the barbie on the beach or in the park, and enjoy some delicious fresh steak or seafood with wines to match. Or if you choose to celebrate with a dinner, a hearty cassoulet is a perfect accompaniment to these cooler evenings.

Whatever you choose to do, here’s our small contribution to Mother’s Day – a quick guide to matching your celebratory food and wine, and some suggested menu ideas.

General guidelines to matching food and wine

Matching food and wine follows pretty much the same principles, no matter the occasion. You need to consider the food you are serving – its ‘weight’, flavour intensity and type, the ingredients and cooking methods – and find a wine with similar characteristics.

As an example, a heavy meat cassoulet should match well with a full-bodied semi-tannic Cabernet Sauvignon, while a white wine with citrus flavours would go well with fish flavoured with lemon. Other combinations include:

  • Pinot Noir – pairs well with ‘earthy’ dishes such as roast duck, lamb kofta, or Italian pasta salad. Taylors Estate Pinot Noir is a medium-bodied wine with cherry and strawberry notes, a silky palate and a subtle savoury earthiness.
  • Sauvignon Blanc – can match well with antipasto, salads, party food, Asian dishes, seafood curry, and vegetarian dishes. A Taylors Estate Sauvignon Blanc with its tropical fruit flavours and delicate acidity would go well with any of these dishes.
  • Pinot Gris – an elegant Taylors Estate Pinot Gris with pear and citrus flavours would go well with salmon, chicken, turkey and salads.
  • Shiraz – a light-bodied Shiraz pairs well with pizza, chicken, kangaroo, pasta dishes and barbecue beef.

The food and wine you select for Mother’s Day really depends on the way you intend celebrating it. Light party food and a celebratory atmosphere may go better with some fun bubbles, such as a delicious Moscato, while a cosy and hearty beef dish served by a roaring fire on a cool night would marry well with a full-bodied red.

Some celebratory menu suggestions for Mother’s Day

Breakfast

Mother’s Day is of course the day when traditionally mum gets breakfast brought to her.

At this time of year when the weather is cooling, a dish of baked eggs and bacon with fresh mushrooms, or scrambled eggs with salmon, may be just what’s needed to start off this special day. If it’s too early in the day for wine, some fresh orange juice or beautiful leaf tea might do the trick. Then again, if it’s not too early, something bubbly such as Taylors Estate Pinot Noir Chardonnay would be nice!

Picnic ideas

If the weather is favourable, a picnic is a lovely way to celebrate with family members. If you are making up your own picnic basket, here are some food and wine ideas:
Taylors White094



BBQ ideas

If you prefer a barbecue, don’t forget to stock up beforehand with some delicious wines to accompany the feast! Ideas include:

Barbecued T-bone steak and salsa or chilli served with a bottle of award-winning 2014 Taylors Estate Shiraz.

Thai barbecue chicken with Riesling, Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc.

Beef burgers with Turkish bread and salad served with Promised Land Cabernet Merlot or Shiraz.

Desserts

What would a feast for mum be without a dessert?

  • Baked figs with orange, honey and pistachios, or spicy poached pears in red wine would go well with some Taylors Estate Merlot to drink.
  • Traditional apple pie with a delicately spiced Gewurztraminer – a lovely white with a velvety sweetness and delicate fruit underlay.

Check out our recipe section for some more ideas for pairing food and wine for Mother’s Day. The recipes range from Asian, Indian and Italian dishes to party food, pâté and pizza, and plenty more in-between, so you’re sure to find something suitable.

And if you happen to be in the Clare on Mother’s Day, why not drop in and grab one of our picnic packs? Our lawn area is perfect for picnics, and there are umbrellas for shelter if they are needed. You could even make a mini-break of it, there’s plenty to see and do in our little corner of South Australia at this time of year. However you choose to celebrate your mum, have a lovely day!

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Here we are at the beginning of April, and the harvest of fruit that will craft the 2015 vintage wines is almost complete.  All of the white varieties have now been harvested, both from the Clare Valley estate and our grower partners in regions across South Australia.  The last white variety to be picked was some Sauvignon Blanc from the Adelaide Hills on the 20th of March.

With the cooler autumn weather persisting, it looks like it will be a long, slow finish for the last remaining red varieties; Cabernet Sauvignon and Carmenere.  On the Taylor family estate, the older, low-yielding blocks were picked by the end of March with only the younger Cabernet Sauvignon blocks and the Carmenere remaining for April.

Oak ExperienceMeanwhile in the cellars, the winemakers had yet another delivery of some exciting new equipment.  The aptly named ‘oak experience’ is a large format oak vat (2100 litres) crafted from 50mm fine-grained French oak staves.  The vessel comes complete with an ‘in place’ submergible header board to ensure the cap is completely ‘drowned’.  This ensures maximum colour and tannin extraction from the red ferments.  At present, it has some seriously good Cabernet Sauvignon fermenting in it from the St. Andrews A70 bock – destined for our most premium wines.  The idea with this vessel is that it enables massive soft and gentle extraction whilst protecting the primary fruit characters. In addition, the wine can be left to soak on skins for extended periods.  The Cabernet Sauvignon in the vessel right now will stay there for 8 to 10 weeks!

Chief Winemaker, Adam Eggins, says that this parcel will then be a key blending option along with the wines fermented in the open barrels – an approach that has yielded outstanding quality improvements in the premium reds since 2006 – and the stainless steel egg fermentation vessel.  The team is very excited about trying these parcels once they complete secondary, malolactic fermentation in the next few months.  Whilst things are winding down with the harvest out in the vineyard, vintage of course will not be finished in the cellars until the last wine completes fermentation.

 

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